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Work and Equalities Institute

Events

The Work and Equalities Institute runs a wide variety of different events and activities, and collaborates with a range of stakeholders.

Forthcoming events

Policy Discussion

The reality of Wellbeing: beyond a fad and fascination

Friday 22nd November 2019

2.30pm to 4pm
Alliance Manchester Business School room 9.041


The labour market, nature of work, businesses and leaders all play a role in protecting, or damaging, the health and wellbeing of individuals, and companies increasingly recognise the value of paying attention to employee health and wellbeing. More than ever before we see open recognition of the value of positive mental health. However, changes in the nature of work (e.g. the gig economy), and workforce demographics (e.g. an ageing workforce), raise new challenges in terms of how to protect the health and wellbeing of the UK workforce. Furthermore, there is considerable uncertainty in the current political climate, and potential threats to employment and worker rights in the future which mean the progress made to date in terms of protecting health and wellbeing at work might be hindered.

What does this mean in terms of how health and wellbeing is viewed? What are current approaches to workplace health and wellbeing? What is the future of health and wellbeing?

The session will reflect on these questions and discuss the possibilities and risks related to health and wellbeing given the changes described above.  There will be discussion of a number of health and wellbeing initiatives and developments in terms of both research and policy.


 

Policy Discussion

Policy Discussion

The reality of wellbeing: beyond a fad and fascination

Friday 22nd Nov 2019
2.30pm to 4pm
Room: AMBS 9.041
Tea and coffee before and after the event, in AMBS 9.040

The labour market, nature of work, businesses and leaders all play a role in protecting, or damaging, the health and wellbeing of individuals, and companies increasingly recognise the value of paying attention to employee health and wellbeing. More than ever before we see open recognition of the value of positive mental health. However, changes in the nature of work (e.g. the gig economy), and workforce demographics (e.g. an ageing workforce), raise new challenges in terms of how to protect the health and wellbeing of the UK workforce. Furthermore, there is considerable uncertainty in the current political climate, and potential threats to employment and worker rights in the future which mean the progress made to date in terms of protecting health and wellbeing at work might be hindered.

What does this mean in terms of how health and wellbeing is viewed? What are current approaches to workplace health and wellbeing? What is the future of health and wellbeing?

The session will reflect on these questions and discuss the possibilities and risks related to health and wellbeing given the changes described above.  There will be discussion of a number of health and wellbeing initiatives and developments in terms of both research and policy.

Speakers include:

Dr Sheena Johnson (presenter) Work and Equalities Institute, Alliance Manchester Business School

Prof Miguel Martinez Lucio (chair and discussant) Work and Equalities Institute, Alliance Manchester Business School

Steve Craig (panel member) Unite the Union

Prof David Holman (panel member) Professor of Organisational Psychology, Alliance Manchester Business School


Read more here.

Annual Lecture

Young women and men and the future of work and family formation
Professor Marian Baird, University of Sydney
Tuesday 4th June
4pm to 6pm
AMBS 3.006a


Most literature and public debate on the future of work revolves around the impact of technology, potential for job loss, changes in work design and new concepts of organisation and leadership. There is much less analysis of the gendered implications of work and labour market change. Using survey data from the Australian Working Women’s Future project, with a sample of 2,100 women and 500 men, augmented with focus group data from women in high and low skill, secure and precarious jobs, this presentation will focus on the experiences and expectations of young workers (16-40 year olds) in Australia.


The results highlight the discrepancies between women’s and men’s current experiences at work and some similarities in how they foresee the future of work and family formation. Our survey data show a convergence between men and women who are parents and young women who are not parents stating the importance for their futures of flexibility and work-family leave policies. Our qualitative data suggest having children is considered in similar ways by young women, regardless of skill level and job security, with the opportunity cost of child bearing versus work, and costs associated with child care and housing rating high in their considerations. These results portend a change in gender relations amongst younger working parents and have implications for policy at state and firm levels about work and family formation.



Marian Baird AO became Professor of Gender and Employment Relations in 2009, distinguishing her as the first female professor in industrial relations at the University of Sydney. In 2018 Marian is a Pro-Chancellor of the University of Sydney and a Fellow of the Senate of the University of Sydney. She is Head of the Discipline of Work and Organisational Studies and Co-Director of the Women, Work and Leadership Research Group in the University of Sydney Business School. Marian is one of Australia's leading researchers in the fields of women, work and care. She is CI on a number of significant research grants, including the Centre of Excellence on Population Ageing Research (CEPAR) and The Australian Women’s Work Futures project. Marian is a very engaged researcher, working with many government departments, organisations, unions and not-for-profits to improve the position for women in the workforce and society.

Printable version

Seminar series 2019-20

Wednesday 9th October 2019
Time: 15:30 - 17:30 (tea and coffee at 15:15)
Venue: Alliance Manchester Business School Room 3.013a

Levelling the playing field: Towards a critical-social perspective on digital entrepreneurship
Dr Angela Martinez Dy, Lecturer in Entrepreneurship, Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Loughborough University London

Read more about the seminar and speaker


ManReg with the Work and Equalities Institute

Thursday 10th October 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Venue: Williamson Building room 3.53

A poverty of labour law? Minimum wage erosion in care work
Professor Lydia Hayes, Kent Law School, University of Kent

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Organisational Psychology Group with the Work and Equalities Institute

Date: Tuesday 22nd October 2019
Time: 18:00 - 19:30 Hrs (coffee/tea at 17:45)
Venue: Alliance Manchester Business School Main Lecture Theatre G.003

The impact of work on (un)healthy aging: How to reduce social inequalities?
Professor Yohannes Siegrist, University of Düsseldorf, Germany

Read more about the seminar and speaker


Wednesday 30th October 2019
Time: 15:30 - 17:30 (tea and coffee at 15:15)
Venue: Alliance Manchester Business School Room 3.013a

Worker power is a relationship, not a resource: Evidence and implcations for practice on and beyond the docks
Dr Katy Fox-Hodess, Lecturer in Employment Relations, Sheffield University Management School

Read more about the seminar and speaker


Wednesday 13th November 2019
Time: 15:30 - 17:30 (tea and coffee at 15:15)
Venue: Alliance Manchester Business School Room 9.041

Law and legalities in everyday working life: towards a co-constitutive theory
Dr Eleanor Kirk, Research Associate, University of Glasgow School of Law

Read more about the seminar and speaker


Wednesday 27th November 2019
Time: 15:30 - 17:30 (tea and coffee at 15:15)
Venue: Alliance Manchester Business School Room Penthouse

Fungibility and social difference: (re)producing migrant labour's differential 'disposability' in the Czech Republic's export manufacturing sector.
Dr Hannah Schling, Lecturer in Human Geography, Queen Mary University of London